Cl2O4 in the Stratosphere 

Project Home Page

Physical chemistry is often perceived as one big collection of derivations with very little connection with reality. This is not really the case because mathematical models often can be applied to help us better understand real phenomena. An example is research on the physical chemistry of the atmosphere that led to the1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Sherwood Rowland, Mario Molina, and Paul Crutzen. Their pioneering calculations on the chemical mechanisms that affect the stratospheric ozone layer and subsequent work by several researchers have helped us realize that man-made chemicals can have serious effects on the earth's atmosphere.

The depletion of ozone in the stratosphere is caused chiefly by ozone reacting with chlorine and bromine from industrially manufactured gases. Several small chlorine oxide molecules are involved in the catalytic cycles that lead to the destruction of ozone. In this project we will use computational chemistry to investigate a larger chlorine oxide, Cl2O4. To the right you have a collection of Web links for the project. Start with the Scenario link and proceed to build, along with your colleagues, a better understanding of the atmospheric implications of Cl2O4.

ball.gif (161 bytes) Scenario

ball.gif (161 bytes) Week 1: Point Groups and Structure of Cl2O4

ball.gif (161 bytes) Week 2: Ab Initio Calculations

ball.gif (161 bytes) Week 3: Discussion/Wrap-up

ball.gif (161 bytes) References

 
 
 
 
 
 


Partial support for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education through grant DUE #9751605 and by CAChe Scientific through a Higher Education Program grant.

The PCOL community that partial support for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education through grant DUE #9950809. Additional support was provided by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. PCOL faculty also acknowledge the National Science Teachers Association which awarded the PCOL Faculty Consortium the 1998 Gustav Ohaus Award for Innovation in College Science Teaching.

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Home Page
Scenario
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
References
CompChem
Group Theory

This site created by David Whisnant (whisnantdm@wofford.edu).
This page was last updated on March 21, 2007
llever@uscupstate.edu